In May, the President of Japan issued a new law that would require cryptocurrency exchanges to register with the government. The news was met with a mixed response from industry leaders and investors. Experts say this could be just the beginning of more regulation in crypto markets as governments worldwide struggle to grasp how blockchain works.

The “sec gamestop report pdf” is a document that was released by the SEC. The document details what it found in its investigation into Gamestop’s financials for early 2021.

Early 2021

Following the busiest transfer season in college basketball history, courtesy to the NCAA’s one-time transfer waiver and an additional year of eligibility given as a consequence of the COVID-19 epidemic, most of the preseason talk about newcomers concentrated on transfers. Sure, the Chet Holmgren vs. Paolo Banchero discussion was entertaining, and there was plenty of coverage about Memphis and its star freshmen, but there was also attention on Chris Beard and Texas using the portal to construct a preseason top-five team, and multiple conventional champions transferring to point guard.

Even though the season is just a month old, there are still a lot of eyeballs on transfers and a lot of controversy around them. Is it more beneficial to develop a roster mostly via the portal rather than relying on predominantly high school prospects? There have been varied outcomes in the first few weeks, and there is no obvious way to address that issue.

Let’s take a look at some of the significant early-season impact moves, as well as those that haven’t quite worked out yet, as the data continues to seep in.

(Thanks to Bart Torvik’s Transfer Portal Finder for making it simple to keep track of transfers and their progress.)

For Kentucky, Oscar Tshiebwe has been a double-double machine. Matt Cashore is a reporter for USA TODAY Sports.

The cream of the crop

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Kentucky’s Oscar Tshiebwe: Tshiebwe returned to his freshman-year form quickly after transferring from West Virginia to the Wildcats. So far this season, he’s been one of the most dominating big men in the nation, racking up seven double-doubles in his first nine games. Tshiebwe is averaging 16.3 points and 14.4 rebounds per game, with at least two blocks in six games and a 67.8% field goal percentage. He has the best offensive rebounding percentage in the country and the fifth best defensive rebounding percentage.

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Minnesota’s Jamison Battle: Ben Johnson and the Golden Gophers have been one of the great stories of the first month of the season, and his transfer-heavy roster has been a big part of it. Battle is the group’s crown jewel. Battle departed midway after putting up strong scoring statistics at George Washington, and his stats have transferred nicely. He leads the team with 18.8 points and 6.4 rebounds per game. Payton Willis, a Charleston transfer who played at Minnesota in 2019-20, is one of his most productive teammates. Willis is averaging 16.5 points, 4.7 rebounds, and 3.5 assists per game, while shooting 45.0 percent from the three-point line.

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Wake Forest: Alondes Williams, Alondes Williams, Alondes Williams, Alondes Williams, Last season, Williams was a solid role player for Oklahoma, albeit in a supporting offensive position. Steve Forbes, on the other hand, has handed Williams the keys to the offense, and he’s delivering big time. This season, he’s averaging 19.8 points, 6.5 rebounds, and 4.7 assists, and his two finest performances have come in the last two weeks: a triple-double against USC Upstate over the weekend and a 36-point performance in a comeback victory against VMI. Williams’ teammate, Indiana State transfer Jake LaRavia, has been as impressive, averaging 14.0 points and 5.7 rebounds while shooting 50.0 percent from the three-point line.

2 Related

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Illinois’ Alfonso Plummer: If Andre Curbelo hadn’t been injured, we would not have realized how important Plummer is to this team. He had a difficult start to the season, averaging only 6.3 points and playing less than 20 minutes in two of his first four games. Plummer, on the other hand, has been as productive as anybody in the nation during the previous six games. During that time, the Utah transfer is averaging 23.7 points per game while shooting 47.5 percent from 3-point range on more than 10 tries. When he’s on offense, he’s a force to be reckoned with.

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LSU’s Tari Eason showed glimpses of his brilliance last season at Cincinnati, but he saw uneven minutes and had little opportunities to display his real ability. Despite coming off the bench in every game this season, it hasn’t been a problem. While averaging 15.8 points and 7.4 rebounds, Eason has been one of the top defensive players in the nation. He had a great game against Georgia Tech last weekend, scoring 23 points and grabbing six rebounds on 9-for-13 shooting.

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Iowa State’s Izaiah Brockington: Perhaps we should have expected Brockington to have a season like this. He was a steady double-figure scorer at Penn State and entered the season as Iowa State’s most experienced offensive player. So far, he’s delivered, averaging 16.6 points and 7.7 rebounds per game, with significant performances in the season’s most important contests. Brockington scored 30 points in a 20-point victory against in-state Iowa at the Barclays Center after scoring 30 points against Xavier.

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Tanner Groves, Oklahoma: Groves made national headlines last season when he scored 35 points in Eastern Washington’s first-round defeat to Kansas in the NCAA tournament. Porter Moser took note, and a few weeks later, he was thrown out of the gateway. Groves has been a huge acquisition for the Sooners, even though he hasn’t yet scored 35 points this season. Groves is averaging 15.0 points and 5.9 rebounds per game while shooting 68.3 percent from the field and 44.7 percent from beyond the arc. In Oklahoma’s weekend victory over Arkansas, he scored 16 points.

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Auburn: K.D. Johnson, As someone who grew up idolizing Johnson’s talent, it was difficult to see him not fitting Bruce Pearl’s system well. His stats aren’t all that different from last season at Georgia, but he’s the second-leading scorer on a top-15 team in the nation and has scored in double digits in all but two games this season. In a defeat to UConn earlier this season, he scored 27 points and showed that he can take over a game offensively.

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Washington: Terrell Brown Jr. The Huskies aren’t having a great season, but Brown is doing all he can to keep them in contention. During his freshman and sophomore seasons at Seattle, he was a significant point scorer, but he struggled offensively last season at Arizona, starting just nine games. Brown has averaged 21.9 points as the focal center of Mike Hopkins’ offense this season, including 32 points in a victory against South Dakota State and 30 points in an overtime defeat to Wyoming.


Top-25 teams in need of PG assistance received a mixed bunch.

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Marcus Carr, Texas: Despite being the most sought-after transfer in the portal last offseason, Carr has struggled to find his footing. Last season at Minnesota, he averaged 19.4 points and 4.9 assists, but those stats had dropped to 9.0 points and 3.9 assists when Chris Beard started Devin Askew ahead of Carr in the victory against Arkansas-Pine Bluff on Tuesday. Carr is also shooting just 38.6% from the field. He still has a vitality off the bounce that few other Texas guards have, but his play has been too inconsistent so far.

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Kansas, Remy Martin: Martin’s biggest worry was whether he’d adapt his game to Kansas’ system, playing more unselfishly and focusing on distributing rather than scoring. So far, he’s succeeded in doing so, while also adding confidence and aggression to the attacking side of the ball. Martin is averaging 10.4 points and 3.1 assists this season, down from 19.1 points and 3.7 assists last season, but he is more efficient, shooting the ball better, and committing less turnovers.

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Baylor’s James Akinjo: Akinjo, a two-time transfer who began his career at Georgetown before transferring to Arizona last season, had his finest game of the season in Baylor’s rout of Villanova on Sunday. Against Collin Gillespie and the Wildcats, he scored 16 points, seven rebounds, and five assists, and he only had one turnover. This season, Akinjo has struggled with turnovers, but he’s producing for his teammates and averaging a career-high in assists.

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Sahvir Wheeler, Kentucky: Wheeler led the SEC in assists last season at Georgia, but with five-star guard TyTy Washington Jr. joining him in the backcourt, most anticipated his usage to diminish at Kentucky. Wheeler’s assists have risen from 7.4 to 7.7, but he continues to struggle with his shooting. Wheeler’s 3-point percentage is only 22.2 percent, and his percentages have slipped lately following a strong start to the season. Wheeler has averaged 6.0 points, 4.7 assists, and 3.3 turnovers in his previous three games.

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Juwan Howard went back to the portal in the summer after having success with Mike Smith as a graduate transfer point guard previous season, and snagged Jones, the Sun Belt Player of the Year from Coastal Carolina. Jones has struggled in Ann Arbor after establishing himself as one of the finest two-way players in the NCAA previous season. He’s averaging 6.8 points, 3.9 assists, and a 25.0 percent 3-point shooting percentage. He might be the deciding factor in whether Michigan can turn things around.

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Tyson Walker, Michigan State: Walker struggled to find his footing in East Lansing, averaging just 5.1 points, 4.8 assists, and 2.9 turnovers in his first eight games. During that time, he shot 39.5 percent from the field, shooting just five three-pointers. But the skilled Northeastern transfer has immediately turned things around, averaging 12.0 points, 6.0 assists, and just 1.7 turnovers in three victories. In those three games, he also shot 52 percent from the field.


Having a change of location has proven to be good.

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Xavier, Jack Nunge: Nunge has been a revelation for Travis Steele’s program on the low end. Through 10 games this season, he’s averaging 13.0 points and 7.5 rebounds, and he’s coming off a 31-point, 15-rebound effort in a rout of crosstown foe Cincinnati. Xavier’s standout big man Zach Freemantle missed the first few games of the season due to injury, but considering Nunge’s performance, he is finding it difficult to return to the roster.

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Tulane’s Jalen Cook: Cook’s performance has risen as much as anybody in the nation this season, rising from 3.1 points in 7.5 minutes at LSU last season to 19.0 points, 3.6 rebounds, and 3.6 assists at Tulane this season. So far, he’s hit 43.2 percent of his 3-point attempts and has three games with at least 21 points.

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Syracuse’s Cole Swider: Despite possessing a talent set that seemed to fit Villanova’s scheme, Swider was never able to carve out a regular role with the Wildcats. But it’s with the Orange that he’s bringing it all together. Swider has increased his averages from 5.7 points and 2.8 rebounds to 12.2 points and 7.4 rebounds this season, while not shooting the ball efficiently. He’ll elevate his game to a new level if his outside shots start dropping at a 35-40 percent rate like they did the previous two seasons.

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Darryl Morsell, Marquette: Morsell was named Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year last season at Maryland, but after entering the transfer portal, he sought a greater offensive role. After never averaging more than 9.0 points in four seasons at College Park, he found that in Shaka Smart at Marquette, who is averaging 13.8 points and shooting 38.3 percent from three. After scoring at least 21 points in each of his first four games of the season, his scoring has slowed in subsequent weeks.

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Louisiana’s Jordan Brown: Brown has finally found his feet and the production is following suit. He didn’t play much as a freshman at Nevada, but he had a terrific season at Arizona last year and is now taking his game to the next level at Louisiana. The former McDonald’s All-American is averaging 14.1 points and 8.9 rebounds while also hitting four 3-pointers despite never making one in college.

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Tulsa’s Jeriah Horne was extremely steady during the final three years of his collegiate career, two of which he spent at Tulsa before moving for one season in Colorado. However, he was a supporting player at each of his locations until returning to Tulsa this season and establishing himself as a go-to man. This season, he’s averaging 17.4 points and 7.2 rebounds, while shooting a career-high 49.6% from the field and 47.1 percent from 3-point range.

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New Mexico’s Jamal Mashburn Jr. Mashburn Jr. was a successful scorer out of high school, averaging 8.2 points per game as a freshman at Minnesota before accompanying Richard Pitino to Albuquerque. He’s thrived in a more attacking role, which is unsurprising. He’s averaging more than 33 minutes per game this season after coming off the bench in 21 of 29 games last year, and his scoring has climbed from 8.2 to 18.3 points. Jaelen House, another teammate, falls within this group as well. The 6-foot guard has improved his scoring average from 5.3 points per game at Arizona State to 16.7 points per game with the Lobos this season.

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Chattanooga’s Silvio De Sousa may have needed a change of scenery more than anybody else in the portal. De Sousa returned in Chattanooga over the summer after dealing with a slew of troubles on and off the court at Kansas. De Sousa, a former five-star recruit coming out of high school, is regaining some of his previous form. He’s averaging 13.4 points and 6.6 rebounds while shooting over 60% from the field.


Breakouts in the mid-majors

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Jamal Cain, Oakland: Cain had a great senior season at Marquette in 2020-21, breaking into the starting lineup after three years on the bench, but he’s been a dominating force since transferring to Oakland. He’s averaging 21.2 points per game, 10.5 rebounds, and almost two steals per game. Cain had five double-doubles this season, including a 31-point, 10-rebound performance against Alabama in November.

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Florida’s Tavian Dunn-Martin Gulf of Mexico: Former TCU big man Kevin Samuel was the FGCU transfer acquisition projected to have the largest effect this season, and although Samuel has been excellent (10.6 PPG, 8.6 RPG, 3.0 BPG), Dunn-Martin has been one of the league’s top players. This season, the former Duquesne guard is averaging 19.5 points and 5.0 assists while shooting 41.1 percent from beyond the arc.

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Sam Houston, Savion Flagg: It’s no surprise that Flagg is the best player in the Southland at Sam Houston. At Texas A&M, he was capable of spectacular performances, particularly during his sophomore season when he averaged 13.9 points and 7.7 rebounds, but his output dwindled as his career progressed. Including the Bearkats, he’s been revitalized, averaging 19.0 points and 8.3 rebounds this season, with double-doubles in three of his past four games.

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Western Kentucky’s Jairus Hamilton: Another performance we may have foreseen, considering that he almost averaged double digits in the ACC last season, but Hamilton has been a force for the Hilltoppers through one month. He’s averaging 16.8 points and 6.4 rebounds per game, and he just recorded a double-double in a rout of Ole Miss.

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Ques Glover, Samford: During his two seasons at Florida, Glover didn’t start a single game, but he was praised for his defense and offered strong point guard depth. This season, he’s been a standout for Samford, improving from 2.5 points and 0.7 assists for the Gators last season to 18.8 points and 4.6 assists this season. Glover has scored more than 20 points four times, including 22 points and six assists last weekend against Belmont.

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Walker Miller, Monmouth: After four years as a walk-on at North Carolina, Miller was seeking for a spot to make an impact in his senior year. At Monmouth, he discovered that under King Rice. After averaging 36 points in four years at Chapel Hill, Miller is averaging 13.9 points and 6.7 rebounds after 11 games. On Tuesday night, he had 16 points and nine rebounds against Yale. Shavar Reynolds, a teammate who started 27 games for Seton Hall last season, has gone from 7.7 points per game for the Pirates to 16.4 points per game for the Hawks this season.

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Northern Arizona’s Jalen Cone: Cone’s scoring and shooting abilities have always been excellent, and his per-minute productivity during his two seasons at Virginia Tech showed a significant potential. Cone has risen to the challenge of a much larger position at Northern Arizona. He’s averaging 17.4 points and 3.2 assists per game while hitting 35.6 percent of his 3-point attempts. He’s had four games with at least 24 points, including a 33-point performance and seven 3-pointers against South Dakota on Saturday.

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San Francisco: Yauhen Massalski. San Francisco is one of the most fascinating early-season shocks, having started 10-0. Head coach Todd Golden brought back several seasoned players, but the Dons have benefited greatly from the emergence of San Diego transfer Massalski as a potential inside option. The Belarusian is averaging 13.7 points and 7.0 rebounds per game while shooting over 60% from the floor. Massalski averaged 20.3 points, 10.7 rebounds, and 2.0 blocks in three consecutive victories against UAB, UNLV, and Fresno State.

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UTRGV’s Justin Johnson was largely a bench player at Southern Miss last season, averaging 5.7 points and starting six games. However, the Florida native has been UTRGV’s top player this season under new head coach Matt Figger. He’s averaging 18.2 points, 6.1 rebounds, and 2.4 assists per game, and he’s shooting 45.9% from beyond the arc.

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South Alabama’s Charles Manning Jr.: Richie Riley has had a lot of success with transfers, and Manning is the latest. He showed potential at LSU two years ago, averaging 7.9 points in 19 games, but he only played six games for the Tigers last season before transferring. Manning Jr. has 17.1 points, 3.9 rebounds, and 3.2 assists in 11 games for South Alabama, providing Riley a dynamic playmaker with height on the perimeter.


Greener grass isn’t necessarily better.

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Oregon: De’Vion Harmon and Quincy Guerrier To this point, the Ducks have been one of the most disappointing teams in the country, going 5-5 overall and 0-2 in the Pac-12. While Harmon and Guerrier can’t be blamed entirely, this can’t be what they had in mind when they departed NCAA tournament teams at Oklahoma and Syracuse, respectively. Harmon’s scoring average has dropped from 12.9 points on 47.7% shooting to 8.6 points on 36.8% shooting. Guerrier was an all-conference pick a year ago after averaging 13.7 points and 8.4 rebounds, but his stats have dropped to 7.4 points and 5.2 rebounds.

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Arizona State’s Marreon Jackson: Jackson was named Player of the Year in the Mid-American Conference last season, and after averaging 18.1 points and 5.9 assists, he seemed to be the finest mid-major transfer in the nation. This season, he is shooting 28.3 percent from the field, 23.2 percent from three-point range, and averaging 8.4 points and 4.2 assists.

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Virginia Tech’s Storm Murphy: Murphy has struggled this season after a strong start to the season, with the Hokies losing four of their past six games. Murphy has averaged 4.5 points and 3.0 assists in those six games, shooting 31.4 percent from the field and 21.1 percent from three-point range. Last season at Wofford, he was named first-team all-conference and was regarded as one of the finest shooters in the country.

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Louisville: Mason Faulkner and Jarrod West, The Cardinals’ offense has failed to find its stride this season, and Faulkner and West, like the rest of the perimeter bunch, have struggled. Faulkner did score 12 points in Western Carolina’s victory against Southeastern Louisiana on Tuesday night, but he’s only averaging 4.0 points after averaging roughly 17 per game the previous two seasons. West has gone from a feisty two-way player averaging 12.5 points and 6.0 assists at Marshall last season to 6.6 points and 3.7 assists on 36.1 percent shooting this season. However, he remains Louisville’s finest defender.

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Ohio State’s Cedric Russell: Russell has showed some life in the last two of huge games, so this one might change in the future. The Louisiana transfer was a late addition to Ohio State’s roster, but he was anticipated to provide plenty of perimeter shooting. However, he only played 23 minutes in the first four games of the season. He subsequently came off the bench against Duke to score 12 points and hit three three-pointers, and he also played 19 minutes off the bench in a victory against Wisconsin. Still only averaging 3.1 points each game.

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Joseph Yesufu, Kansas: Yesufu had a fantastic last season at Drake, averaging 23.2 points and shooting 46.9% from three-point range in the last nine games. He chose to move to Kansas, where he would be expected to provide depth to the backcourt. However, the Jayhawks also signed Remy Martin, Jalen Coleman-Lands, and freshman Bobby Pettiford, so Yesufu’s job hasn’t been available. He’s averaging 2.7 points per possession.

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Kentucky’s Kellan Grady: Grady knew he wouldn’t have the same scoring role in Lexington as he had when he was an all-conference player for four seasons at Davidson, so it’s definitely not a “grass isn’t greener” issue. He’s still shooting 40% from three-point range. However, he has gone from averaging 17-18 points a game with the Wildcats to 9.1 points per game with Kentucky, scoring in single digits in seven of his nine games.

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Alabama’s Noah Gurley: Gurley seemed to be an ideal match for Nate Oats’ system as a slashing, inside-outside forward who could hit shots from the perimeter, but his time in Tuscaloosa hasn’t gone as planned. With the Oats choosing for a smaller 1-4 lineup and the emergence of freshman Charles Bediako at center, Gurley hasn’t had much of a chance to be more than a bench player. He’s averaging 6.4 points this season after scoring 15.4 last year.

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Naz Bohannon, Clemson: At Youngstown State, Bohannon was a physical presence in the Horizon last season, averaging 16.5 points and 8.2 rebounds. But he hasn’t been able to make the same kind of impact at Clemson thus far. In Tuesday’s victory against Miami (Ohio), he scored 10 points, four rebounds, and three assists, and his role has grown in the previous five or six games. Bohannon is averaging 5.1 points, 3.8 rebounds, and 2.5 assists per game.

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Daniel Oladapo, Pittsburgh: Another tiny inside player who put up high numbers at the mid-major level, Oladapo has struggled to adapt his success to the Big East. Oladapo is down to 4.6 points and 2.4 rebounds for the Panthers after averaging 12.9 points and 8.8 rebounds for Oakland previous season. In his past five games, he’s averaged less than eight minutes per game.

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The “gme sec report” is a newsletter that presents the latest information on the global economy.

  • staff report on equity and options market structure conditions in early 2021
  • sec meme stock report
  • earli conference
  • sec gamestop announcement
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